INDEPENDENT / SUNDAY MIRROR POLITICAL POLL DECEMBER 2016
Favourability Index and Globalisation Questions
  • Appearing on Strictly Come Dancing has done wonders for perceptions of Ed Balls, as his favourability rating has moved from -39 in January 2015 when he was Shadow Chancellor, to -11 today
  • His political opposite number, George Osborne, over the same period has seen his ratings slide from -26 to -39
  • Even Conservative voters are more likely to have an unfavourable view of George Osborne than a favourable one (32% to 27%)
  • The other major improver, and since August 2016, is President-Elect Donald Trump whose favourability rating has improved from -69 to -52 (although he still has the worst score in the poll)
  • Having Boris as Foreign Secretary will help Theresa May retain UKIP voters, who are more likely than Conservative voters to have a favourable view of him (56% to 53%)
  • 54% of UKIP voters have a favourable view of their new leader Paul Nuttall which compares to 78% of Conservative voters who have a favourable view of Theresa May and 58% of Labour voters who have a favourable view of Jeremy Corbyn
  • Philip Hammond has yet to make much of an impression on his own party, with only 28% of Conservative voters who say they have a favourable view of him, and14% whose view is unfavourable

 

The NET score ranking is as follows:

1.    Theresa May +11 (and so the only politician with a positive NET score, albeit she is seven points down on August)

2.    Boris Johnson -6

3.    Ed Balls -11

4.    The Conservative Party -12

5.    Philip Hammond -12

6.    The Labour Party -17

7.    John McDonnell -19

8.    Nigel Farage -26

9.    Jeremy Corbyn -26

10.  Paul Nuttall -32

11.  George Osborne -39

12.  Donald Trump -52

 

Favourability Index

  1. Do you have a favourable or unfavourable opinion of each of the following?
  Favourable Unfavourable Neither Don’t know NET

(Fav-Unfav)

Theresa May 41%

(-1)

30%

(+6)

23%

(-3)

6%

(-2)

+11
Boris Johnson 33%

(-3)

39%

(+2)

23%

(+1)

5%

(-)

-6
George Osborne 13%

(-6)

52%

(+7)

28%

(+3)

7%

(-1)

-39
The Conservative Party 32%

(+1)

44%

(+2)

20%

(-1)

4%

(-2)

-12
Paul Nuttall (NEW) 10% 42% 29% 18% -32
The Labour Party 28%

(+2)

45%

(-1)

22%

(-)

5%

(-1)

-17
Nigel Farage 25%

(+1)

51%

(-)

19%

(-1)

4%

(-1)

-26
Jeremy Corbyn 24%

(+2)

50%

(-)

21%

(-)

6%

(-1)

-26
Philip Hammond 15%

(+1)

27%

(+5)

38%

(+4)

21%

(-8)

-12
Ed Balls 21%

(+9)

32%

(-19)

36%

(+8)

11%

(+3)

-11
Donald Trump 13%

(+6)

65%

(-11)

17%

(+5)

6%

(+1)

-52
John McDonnell 8%

(+2)

27%

(+3)

29%

(-)

37%

(-3)

-19

Changes since August 2016 except * denotes January 2015 results for Balls and Osborne (the last time they were directly compared)

 

Tax & Economy Questions

 

Statement   Don’t know   Statement
I am prepared to pay more tax if it was spent only on helping young homeless people 35% 19% 46% I am not prepared to pay more tax even if it was spent only on helping young homeless people
Globalisation has pushed wages lower for British workers 49% 29% 23% Globalisation has not pushed wages lower for British workers
Globalisation has led to more jobs being created 38% 31% 31% Globalisation has led to fewer jobs being created

 

Globalisation has led to more inequality between rich and poor 51% 29% 21% Globalisation has led to less inequality between rich and poor
Technology is helping to bridge the gap between rich and poor in Britain 32% 28% 40% Technology is widening the gap between rich and poor in Britain
Low interest rates have helped the rich get richer while the poor get poorer 51% 23% 26% Low interest rates have benefited poorer people more than the rich
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Date Published
10 December 2016
Client
Independent / Sunday Mirror
Methodology
ComRes interviewed 2,040 GB adults online on 7 and 8 December 2016.  Data were weighted to be demographically representative of all GB adults and by past vote recall.

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