CBI provider diversity poll
A survey of 1003 GB adults by telephone between 29th June and 1st July 2012.

 

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Date Published
10 Jul 2012

Further Description

 MOST PEOPLE THINK INVOLVEMENT OF BUSINESSES AND CHARITIES IN DELIVERING PUBLIC SERVICES WOULD IMPROVE QUALITY AND DELIVER BETTER VALUE – CBI TELLS GOVERNMENT TO STOP ‘DRAGGING ITS FEET’ ON REFORM

Government Open Services White Paper - one year on and little progress

n the anniversary of the Government’s Open Public Services White Paper, new CBI research of 1,003 British adults published today (Wednesday), shows that two thirds or more of people agree that a variety of different organisations providing a public service, including government, charities and the private sector, would be more successful than just one provider. 
 
75% agree that a variety of different providers would be more successful than just one provider at coming up with new ways of doing things
 
65% agree that a variety  of different providers would be more successful than just one provider at reducing costs to the taxpayer
 
71% agree in relation to ensuring good customer service
 
70% agree in relation to improving services for the end user
 
With reports that the Government is only a fraction of the way through its programme of departmental spending cuts, there is a long way to go before the deficit is brought under control. The only way to maintain outcomes while reducing spending on the scale the government intends, is through radical reform of services. And new ideas will only emerge if services are opened up to new providers such as businesses and charities.
 
Katja Hall, CBI Chief Policy Director, said:
“Most people agree that a variety of providers, including the private sector, would deliver good quality public services and better value for the taxpayer.
 
“A year on since its Open Public Services White Paper the Government has made some steps in the right direction but progress is inconsistent and slow moving. 
 
“The government must stop dragging its feet. The potential benefits are clear. The public are supportive. We need to see urgent action to open up public services to meet the needs of users and maintain quality, while achieving necessary budget cuts.”
 
Dr Peter Kyle, ACEVO Deputy Chief executive, said:
"The third sector has a long history of providing tailored and people-centred support to those in greatest need and there is solid evidence that inclusion of the sector in the delivery of welfare services has driven up standards and increased user satisfaction. 
 
The latest CBI research builds on this understanding and underscores the necessity for us to put the needs of service users unequivocally at the heart of decision making in this time of social and economic upheaval. 
The government has promised to deliver this but so far failed to deliver on a transformative scale and in an era when people are replying on support in increasing numbers there is no time to waste."
 
Methodology note: ComRes interviewed 1003 GB adults by telephone between 29th June and 1st July 2012. Data were weighted to be demographically representative of all GB adults.
 

 

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