RenewableUK Onshore Wind Poll

Poll of British voters nationally and in marginal constituencies for RenewableUK on the topic of onshore wind.

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Date Published
10 Jul 2014

Further Description

New research for RenewableUK shows politicians opposing wind farms ‘a turn-off’ for voters

New independent research from ComRes – commissioned by RenewableUK – shows that political parties that oppose onshore wind development are likely to lose twice as many votes as they gain. In the 40 most marginal Lab-Con constituencies that margin doubles, with parties opposing onshore wind losing four times more voters than they attract.

The opinion poll research revealed that of those surveyed:

  • 30% of Britons would be less likely to vote for a party that proposed to halt the deployment of further onshore wind schemes, with only 15% being more likely to.
  • Supporters of Conservative, Labour and the Liberal Democrats are all turned off by an anti-onshore wind attitude:  voters of all three parties would be less likely to vote for a party which was anti-onshore wind than would be more likely.
  • In the 40 most marginal Conservative/Labour constituencies nearly four times as many people would be turned off by an anti-onshore wind party, with 39% saying they would be less likely to vote for a national party which blocked further development, and just 10% being more likely to.
  • The findings become even clearer once people were made aware of reports suggesting that household bills may need to rise if renewable targets are to be met through other means, as suggested by the Royal Academy of Engineering earlier this year. Five times more voters are likely to prefer the continued development of onshore wind compared to halting all further projects and bill rises (85% vs 15%).
  • In contrast, local candidates for election who are in favour of the development of onshore wind are likely see a boost in their support. Almost a quarter of adults (23%) said they would be more likely to support such a candidate, in comparison to just 16% who would be less likely to. The margin again grows in the 40 most marginal Conservative/Labour seats to 23% and 12% respectively. 

Methodology Note: ComRes interviewed 2,065 GB adults online between 20th and 22nd June 2014. Data were weighted to be representative of all GB adults aged 18+. ComRes also interviewed a representative sample of 1,008 GB adults living in the 40 most marginal constituencies where the Conservatives and Labour shared first and second place between them at the last General Election in 2010. Of these 40 constituencies, 25 currently have a Conservative MP and 15 currently have a Labour MP. Each constituency is represented in the sample equally, with results weighted to be representative of all adults in all 40 constituencies as a whole.

 

 

 

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