REPUTATION COMMUNICATIONS – OVERSEAS AID CHARITIES
A survey of British adults on Overseas Aid Charities.

0.7% target

  • Half of adults in Britain (52%) say that the UK Government should not continue to spend 0.7% of GNI (Gross National Income) on overseas aid/ support annually.
  • There is a significant difference in perceptions across different age groups, with 18-24 year olds most likely to say that the Government should continue with the 0.7% target (48% of this age group say this). This compares with just 19% of those aged over 65% who agreed the Government should continue its commitment.
  • For those who say that the UK should continue with overseas aid, the explanation they are most likely to give is that it is the UK’s duty to support other countries (70%). This is broadly consistent across age groups
  • Men are significantly more likely than women to say that spending on overseas aid is good for the UK’s reputation (63% v 44%).
  • For those who say that the UK should not continue spending on overseas aid, the justification they are most likely to give is that spending overseas aid should be less of a priority than spending in the UK (73% say this).
  • There is also a significant age dynamic at play here, with older adults significantly more likely than their younger counterparts to say that spending on overseas aid should be less of a priority than spending in the UK (83% of those aged 55 and over say this compared to 50% of those aged 18-34).
  • Asked if the 0.7% target was scrapped by the UK Government, what they would like the money to be spent on, adults in Britain are far more likely to say the NHS than any other option tested. For example, 61% said the NHS compared to the next most popular option, social care, at just 7%.

Oxfam and Save the Children

  • When asked whether recent news stories about Oxfam and Save the Children staff has had any impact on their trust of overseas aid charities, the majority of adults (68%) said that there has been a negative impact.
  • Consistent with other questions, there is an age dynamic to the responses, with older adults more likely than younger adults to say that these stories have had a negative impact (79% of those aged 55 and over say this, compared to 51% of 18-34 year old). Nevertheless, all age groups are more likely to say that the impact has been negative rather than positive.

Future spending

  • When asked, outside of disaster and emergency relief, where money spent on overseas aid should be directed, adults in Britain are most likely to cite health projects (two thirds – 66%, say this).
  • The least popular option for spending is funding organisations like the World Bank or the UN, with just 4% of adults supporting this option.
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Date Published
28/02/2018
Categories
Client
Reputation Communications
Methodology
Methodology note: ComRes surveyed 2,013 British adults aged 18+ between 23rd and 25th December 2017. Data has been weighted to be representative of British adults aged 18+ by age, gender, region and social grade. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

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